Pet Ownership

  • Dog and cat registrations are due each financial year commencing 1 July and concessions apply for desexed, microchipped & desexed dogs and pensioners.

    Dog  and cat owners are advised that registrations are now due for animals over the age of three (3) months in both urban and rural areas.

    To register your pet, please complete the Dog Registration Application form, and/or Cat Registration Application form and forward to Council together with the required documentation (e.g. desexing certificate, copy of blue concession card etc) and fee. 

    A Multiple Dog Permit is required to keep more than 2 dogs and a Multiple Cat Permit is required to keep more than 3 cats.

    Should you need to replace your animal's tag, please complete the Replacement Tag Application and forward to us together with the required fee.

    Working Dog Application - In order to be eligible to register a dog as a working dog, an applicant must meet all of the following criteria:

    1. The dog must be kept on rural land, and, 
    2. The owner of the dog must be a primary producer (or engaged or employed by a primary producer, and, 
    3. The dog is primarily used for the purpose of: 
    • Droving, protecting, tending or working with stock, or being trained in droving, protecting or working stock, and 
    • Does not include a class of dog prescribed under a regulation. 

    For current up to date registration fee’s please visit the Fees and Charges page.

  • Owning a pet is a rewarding experience! However, your pet depends on you for its care and control. Below are some helpful hints for owning a pet in the Whitsunday Region.

    Dogs

    • Register your dog from 3 months of age and ensure it wears its registration tag at all times
    • Desex and microchip your dog 
    • Teach your children to be responsible with their dog and supervise them when they are playing
    • Walk and exercise your dog regularly and ensure you are not walking your dog in a prohibited area
    • Find out where the dog off-leash locations are in your part of the region
    • Adhere to dog etiquette when using dog off-leash and on-leash locations 
    • Advise Council of change of ownership details and address 
    • Always clean up after your dog if it defecates in a public place
       

    To find out more about how to care for your dog and our Dog Management Laws, please read the Responsible Dog Ownership factsheet.

    Cats

    • Register your cat from 3 months of age and ensure it wears its registration tag at all times
    • Desex and microchip your cat
    • Keep your cat safely enclosed on your property
    • Put an identification tag on your cat's collar and attach bells to warn wildlife
    • Play with your cat each day and provide it with toys and a scratching post
       

    To find out more about how to care for your cat and our Cat Management Laws, please click Responsible Cat Ownership factsheet.
     

    Guide Dogs within the Whitsunday Region

    Our region is home to multiple Guide Dogs and their local handlers. By keeping pets under control and on a lead in public places, residents can help our local Guide Dogs feel comfortable walking down the street, visiting shops and enjoying our wonderful beaches and parks.

    It is important that all pets, event those on leads, must not approach or interact with a working Guide Dog and their handler as any interruptions to the Guide Dog's concentration can pose a danger to their safety.

    To help our local Guide Dogs and handlers travel safely around the region, please adhere to the advice.

    Guide dogs rz

     

  • Why do dogs bark?

    • Dogs are social animals and often bark when they are lonely.
    • Separation from an owner can cause dogs bark because they are stressed.
    • Barking may be the result of boredom and frustration.
    • Barking is a dog's way of seeking attention from its owner.
    • Dogs bark out of fear - this can be fear of people, objects, or other dogs.
    • Dogs bark when there is a threat to their territory.
    • Dogs bark when there is a change to the family structure or their territory.

    Controlling barking

    Barking can be controlled through behavioural changes. Some behavioural changes could be as small as walking your dog multiple times a day to relieve boredom.

    Dogs require a certain amount of interaction on a daily basis. If your dog barks when you are away from the premises it is probably due to loneliness.

    An easy way of combating this is to provide your pet with stimulants to keep them occupied while you are away such as balls and chew toys.

    Give the dog a bone when you leave the house. This will teach your dog that when you leave there is a positive reaction.

    A fence that is correctly designed to restrict your dog's vision will also help reduce barking. Obedience training and discipline are also very important when trying to stop a barking problem.

    My neighbour’s dog barks, what can I do?

    We encourage you to talk to your neighbour directly as soon as the problem arises. Chances are, they may not be aware that their dog is barking or that it is bothering you. If you are uncomfortable addressing your neighbour directly, we recommended placing the Dear Neighbour – Barking Dog letter in their mailbox.

    Give your neighbour time to address the issue. If the barking persists, you should contact us on 1300 972 753 to report the issue for further investigation.

    We will provide you with a log sheet to monitor the dog’s barking habits for a minimum period of 14 days.

    While our officers conduct the investigation, it is expected that you will continue to keep a log of nuisance events caused by the barking dog.

  • Why do dogs wander?

    • Animals are social creatures dependent on their pack for company, leadership and guidance. A pet that is left alone for extended periods and not exercised or socialised with the family may seek out the company of other animals.
    • Entire animals (not desexed) will wander to seek out a partner.
    • Some animals may wander in search of food.
    • Fear or anxiety from loud noises such as fireworks or thunder can cause animals to flee their yards in seek of safety.

    Controlling wandering

    Wandering animals have a negative impact on the community, who have a right to walk in public places without fear of being attacked. If your animal is found wandering at large, we can issue you an on the spot fine.

    To reduce the likelihood of your dog wandering you should consider the following:

    • Desexing your pet – desexed animals are less likely to wander.
    • Fencing your property and ensuring your gate is secure.
    • Providing your pet with stimulants to keep them occupied while you are away such as balls and chew toys.
    • Teaching your dog basic commands and to only go out when you allow them to.

    My neighbour’s dog wanders, what can I do?

    We encourage you to talk to your neighbour directly as soon as the problem arises. Chances are, they may not be aware that their dog is wandering in your street while they are not home. If you are uncomfortable addressing your neighbour directly, we recommended placing the Dear Neighbour – Wandering Dog letter in their mailbox.

    Give your neighbour time to address the issue. If the wandering persists you should contact us on 1300 972 753 to report the issue.

    When complaints are received about wandering animals, we will increase patrols in the area which may result in the animal being impounded.

Pet Ownership Documents

Pet Ownership Documents

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